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HIV Prevention

About HIV and AIDS

HIV RibbonHIV Frequently Asked Questions

HIV does not discriminate. It affects all ages, socio-economic groups, races, and sexual orientations. HIV is the virus that can lead to Acquired Immunodeficiency Virus (AIDS). In Montana, 488 people (one in 2000) are living with HIV or AIDS. That number includes two children and 45 people over 49 years of age.

HIV is transmitted through unprotected sexual activity with an infected person, by using infected needles, or through birth or breast milk if the mother is infected. You cannot get HIV through kissing, sharing a drinking glass, eating utensils or touching a toilet seat. Yet, according to a recent Kaiser Family Foundation public opinion survey, nearly one-half of Americans believe one or more of these misconceptions to be true.

HIV Brochures

Prevention

For people with multiple sex partners, the best way to prevent the transmission of HIV is to use a latex condom for vaginal, anal or oral sex. For injecting drug users, never share needles or syringes for drugs, steroids or vitamins. Never share needles or inks for tattoos, ear piercing or body piercing. Don't mix sex and drugs. Alcohol and other drugs can make it difficult to avoid risk behavior. For more information, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.

HIV Prevention Community Planning

Montana’s HIV prevention community planning process is structured for the purpose of meeting the goals for HIV Prevention Community Planning as described in the 2003-2008 HIV Prevention Community Planning Guidance.

Goal One – Community planning supports broad-based community participation in HIV prevention planning.

Goal Two - Community planning identifies priority HIV prevention needs (a set of priority target populations and interventions for each identified target population) in each jurisdiction.

Goal Three - Community planning ensures that that HIV prevention resources target priority populations and interventions set forth in the comprehensive HIV prevention plan.

HIV Testing

More than one-million Americans are infected with HIV, and one in four of them does not know it. Forty-one thousand Americans are infected with HIV each year. Half of them are teenagers.

In 2006, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended HIV testing as part of routine medical examinations for anyone 13 – 64 years of age. Anonymous or confidential HIV testing is available throughout Montana.
There is still no cure for HIV and AIDS, but breakthrough antiretroviral medicines have greatly increased the life expectancy of people living with HIV and AIDS.

Treatment

HIV Forms

Contact information

HIV/STD Section
(406) 444-3565

Page last updated 02/26/2014