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April 2, 2012

DPHHS promotes national tobacco use prevention media campaign

Ads now airing in Montana

The Department of Public Health and Human Services announced today that the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has launched a national education campaign that depicts the harsh reality of illness and damage real people suffer as a result of smoking and spit tobacco use and exposure to secondhand smoke.

The ads show the toll smoking-related illnesses take on real people and their loved ones and can be viewed at www.cdc.gov/quitting/tips.

The spots are airing now statewide in Montana.
The “Tips from Former Smokers” campaign features compelling stories of former tobacco users living with smoking-related diseases and disabilities. The ads focus on smoking-related lung and throat cancer, heart attack, stroke, Buerger’s disease, and asthma. Smokers who quit also pass along tips about what helped them succeed.

“The ads show real people living with real, painful consequences from smoking,” said DPHHS Director Anna Whiting Sorrell. “We hope these ads encourage smokers to quit, to keep children from ever beginning to smoke, and to drastically reduce the harm caused by tobacco.”

Despite the known dangers of tobacco use, nearly one in five adults in the United States and 19% of adults in Montana smoke. More than 1,400 Montanans each year lose their lives to smoking-related diseases (that’s an average of four per day). Still, nearly 70% of smokers say they want to quit, and over 40% try to quit each year.
DPHHS State Medical Officer Dr. Steven Helgerson added, “I highly recommend that Montanans who want to quit using tobacco, use methods known to work,” he said. “These methods include professional counseling and cessation medication. The Montana Quit Line is a great place to start, and it is free.”

The ads will be tagged with 1-800-QUIT-NOW, Montana’s free tobacco quit line which offers cessation help to tobacco users. Benefits include free nicotine replacement therapy (gum, lozenges, or patches), free professional counseling, and discounted Chantix and Bupropion medication.  For more information about these benefits, simply call 1-800-QUIT-NOW, or visit www.tobaccofree.mt.gov.  For more information on the “Tips from Former Smokers” campaign, visit www.cdc.gov/quitting/tips.

Page last updated: 07/30/2013